Inexpensive Cleaning Tips

by Tyler Evans

These Inexpensive Cleaning Hacks Will Keep Dog Messes From Taking Over Your Home

What’s the best thing about having a dog? The love, cuddles, playtime, laughs… we could go on and on. The worst thing about having a dog? Hands down, that would be the messes! That doesn’t mean you’re doomed to have a stinky, dirty home, though. We’ve compiled the best inexpensive ways to get rid of those messes and even prevent them in the first place.

Target the Tough Stuff

Pet Odors

Perhaps the trickiest issue you’ll have is pet odors, and the big problem is how they set into your home over time. One easy way to get rid of smells is to wash everything your dog uses. Be sure to get a dog bed that’s machine washable, along with bowls and toys that can go in the dishwasher.

You can also keep smells at bay by sprinkling baking soda on surfaces that you can’t toss in the washing machine. Just be sure to vacuum it up as baking soda can be toxic to dogs if ingested.  If smells are strong, you may need to deep clean your home. Urine odors are the worst to become set in, especially in carpets. The best strategy for getting rid of these smells is to use an enzymatic-based cleaner. The trick is to let the solution soak into the surface before cleaning it up. This way, the cleaner has time to break down the root cause of the smell.

Fur and Dander

Wouldn’t it be nice if your cute little pup could just keep all his fur to himself? Since we can’t stop dogs from shedding, the best strategy for getting rid of fur is to clean it up frequently. An inexpensive way to get fur off hard floors is to run a dust mop over them daily. Models that have throwaway pads are nice for convenience, but to keep costs even lower, you could get one with washable pads.

When you need to get fur off of furniture and clothes, many people swear by lint rollers, but another dirt cheap and easy solution is to use rubber gloves. Simply put on a pair of clean rubber gloves, get them a little damp, and rub them over the surface to pick up the pet hair.

Sticky, Icky Messes

Dogs don’t wipe their paws before coming inside, and they aren’t very good at keeping drool to themselves either. To clean these messes from hard floors, Puracy recommends investing in natural products. And because we all need soft spaces, too, Architectural Digest recommends using washable rugs or floor tiles instead of traditional carpet. To get slobber and nose prints off of windows, a simple solution of dish soap and rinse agent is inexpensive and easy to make, plus it gets rid of the spots without leaving streaks behind.

Limit the Opportunity for Mess

Set Designated Pet Areas

There are also ways you can limit messes, and one of those is to have designated areas where your pup is allowed. Depending on the rooms you choose, you may be able to use gates, but it’s also good to train dogs to know where they’re allowed. Some dogs are easier to train than others, and if you encounter difficulties, one affordable solution is to use a dog training collar. Some collars can be controlled with a remote, while others deliver shocks or vibrations as deterrents.

Keep a Cleaner Pup

Another obvious solution to limit messes is to keep a cleaner pup. This can be easier said than done, but it helps to have a plan. For example, if it’s a rainy day and you know your pooch will get his paws muddy, the website Expert Home Tips recommends keeping a shallow bowl of water and a towel by the door for a quick foot bath when you return.

The reality of having a dog is that you can prevent some messes, but others are unavoidable. This is a fact of life with four-legged friends, which is why you need a budget-friendly strategy for tackling the tough stuff. Of course your lovable little pup is worth it, but that doesn’t mean your home has to be sacrificed for his sake.

Photo credit: Pixabay